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Bike and Pedestrian Infrastructure Projects Create More Jobs—So Why is Funding Out of Whack?

Bike and Pedestrian Infrastructure Projects Create More Jobs—So Why is Funding Out of Whack?

When it comes to our nation’s commitment to investing in transportation infrastructure, Caron Whitaker of America Bikes reports that “12% of all trips are by bike or on foot, yet America spends only about 1% of its transportation budget on bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.“ Add to that the startling statistic that nearly 14% of all traffic-related fatalities are bicyclists and pedestrians, and you begin to see a picture emerge that something’s kind of screwy in the land of transportation funding.

Ode to Capital Bikeshare: A Shining Light in Winter

Ode to Capital Bikeshare: A Shining Light in Winter

Something stirs in the dirty, slushy streets

And my winter-weary eyes alight upon a streaking flash

Fiery, red, fierce—CaBi warms my soul and shines like a springtime star.

 Oh, Capital Bikeshare –you live, you breath,

You guide me like a lamp in the darkest night.

Ultimate fighter, warrior and champion—you complete me.

Here at goDCgo, we don’t just blog—we also write astonishingly bad poetry. But really, there seemed to be no other way to adequately express the magnitude of how awesome it is that Capital Bikeshare remains open during the entire year, winter months included.

Proposed Routes Highlight Report on D.C Streetcar System

Proposed Routes Highlight Report on D.C Streetcar System

This story comes to us from Abby Lane:

 

The Committee of 100 on the Federal City (C100) today released a detailed assessment of the proposed 37-mile streetcar system for Washington, D.C.  The report, “Building a World-Class Streetcar System for a World-Class City,” analyzes the proposed routes and highlights seven recommendations to bring streetcars back to D.C.


Why Does DC Need a Streetcar System?

Why Does DC Need a Streetcar System?

Plans for the DC Streetcar system have been in the works for several years and construction has already begun on the Anacostia line, where service is planned to begin in the fall of 2012. As a newcomer to the DC area, I still ask many questions. Here was my question about the streetcar system: huh? Translated, that means: if DC already has Metrorail, Metrobus, the Circulator and Capital Bikeshare, why do we require another separate transportation system? Why not expand the bus system instead? I was flummoxed.

If you too have ever questioned the logic of re-introducing a streetcar system to our beloved city (yes, DC had streetcars right up until the mid-1960’s), here’s a bit of background.

What Is This Bizarre Substance In Front of the Dupont Metro?

What Is This Bizarre Substance In Front of the Dupont Metro?

So there are always coffee or ice cream spills in front of metro stops throughout the city...but this particular substance might take the cake on disgustingness.

I saw it this morning when I got off the Dupont South Metro escalators, and was thoroughly grossed out.  

Any guesses as to what it is?  And how long do you think it will take to be cleaned up?

High-Speed Rail for D.C.? Washington, D.C. – New York Corridor Gets Top Score in Study

High-Speed Rail for D.C.? Washington, D.C. – New York Corridor Gets Top Score in Study

Do you dream of the day when you can commute anywhere along the northeast corridor, from D.C. to Boston, in a fraction of the time it currently takes? America 2050 recently released a study indentifying the high-speed rail corridors with the greatest ridership potential throughout the nation and found that the D.C. to New York corridor ranked the highest.

“Home Saver”: In Tough Times, The Housing Finance Agency Makes Living Near Your Work Tenable

“Home Saver”: In Tough Times, The Housing Finance Agency Makes Living Near Your Work Tenable

No sooner had the effects of our New Year’s Eve activities worn off when economists pounced to deliver the dreary news about what we can expect for our economy in 2011. Foreclosures are going to peak in 2011? Awesome. Thanks.

The District is not immune to this trend, which will mean hundreds of DC residents who are forced to move from their homes, probably settling in less expensive suburbs. This is exactly the kind of scenario we want to avoid in terms of the effect it has on transportation and commuting in our region. As people flock to the suburbs, from DC or elsewhere, they increase both traffic congestion and the need for additional transportation infrastructure and maintenance. goDCgo strongly encourages a “live near your work” strategy to reduce ill effects on an already-stressed transportation system and to improve the quality of life of those who work in DC—by remaining in DC.